What I’ve Been Up To

Historically, I post fairly regularly on this blog, but I haven’t been lately. It’s not for lack of anything to write about, but rather a lack of time to devote to blogging. I want to post at greater length about some of the stuff I’ve been doing, and I have several draft posts, but I wanted to list what I’ve been up to for two reasons:

  1. I use my blog as a sort of informal record of what I accomplished over the course of the year, hurdles I ran into, etc. I also sometimes use it to start a dialog about something, or to ‘think out loud’ about ideas. So it’s partially for my own reference.
  2. Someone might actually be interested in something I’m doing and want to pitch in, fork a repo, point me at an existing tool I’m reinventing, give me advice, or actually make use of something I’ve done or something I’ve learned and can share.

PyCon 2013

I’m participating again for the third year in the Program Committee and anywhere else I can help out (time permitting) with the organization of PyCon. It’s historically been a fantastic and really rewarding experience that I highly (and sometimes loudly) recommend to anyone who will listen. Some day I want to post at greater length about some actual instances where being really engaged in the community has been a win in real, practical ways. For now, you’ll have to take my word for it. It’s awesome.

I also hope to submit a talk for PyCon 2013. Anyone considering doing this should know a couple of things about it:

  1. Even though I participate in the Program Committee, which is a completely volunteer committee that takes on the somewhat grueling process of selecting the talks, tutorials, and poster sessions, it’s pretty much unrelated to my chances of having my talk accepted. In other words, submitting a talk is as daunting for me as it is for anyone. Maybe more so.
  2. Giving a talk was a really rewarding experience, and I recommend to anyone to give it a shot.

I just published a really long post about submitting a talk to PyCon. It’s full of completely unsolicited advice and subjective opinions about the do’s and don’ts of talk submission, based on my experiences as both a submitter of proposals and a member of the Program Committee, which is the committee that selects the talks.

Python Cookbook

Dave Beazley and I are really rolling with the next edition of the Python Cookbook, which will cover Python 3 *only*. We had some initial drama with it, but the good news is that I feel that Dave and I have shared a common vision for the book since just about day one, and that shared vision hasn’t changed, and O’Reilly hasn’t forced our hand to change it, which means the book should be a really good reflection of that vision when it’s actually released. I should note, however, that the next edition will represent a pretty dramatic departure from the form and function of previous versions. I’m excited for everyone to see it, but that’s going to have to wait for a bit. It’s still early to talk about an exact release date – I won’t know that for sure until the fall, but I would expect it to be at PyCon 2013.

PyRabbit

I’ve blogged a bit about pyrabbit before: it’s a Python client for talking to RabbitMQ’s RESTful HTTP Management API. So, it’s not for building applications that do message passing with AMQP — it’d be more for monitoring, polling queue depths, etc., or if you wanted to build your own version of the browser-based management interface to RabbitMQ.

Pyrabbit is actually being used. Last I looked, kombu was actually using it, and if memory serves, kombu is used in Celery, so pyrabbit is probably installed on more machines than I’m aware of at this point. I also created a little command shell program called bunnyq that will let you poke at RabbitMQ remotely without having to write any code. You can create & destroy most resources, fire off a message, retrieve messages, etc. It’s rudimentary, but it’s fine for quick, simple tests or to validate your understanding of the system given certain binding types, etc.

I have a branch wherein I port the unit tests for Pyrabbit to use a bit of a different approach, but I also need to flesh out more parts of the API and test it on more versions of RabbitMQ. If you use Pyrabbit, you should know that I also accept pull requests if they come with tests.

Stealth Mode

Well, ‘stealth’ is a strong word. I actually don’t believe much in stealth mode, so if you want to know just ask me in person. Anyway, between 2008 and 2012 I’ve been involved in startups (both bought out, by the way! East Coast FTW!) that were very product driven and very focused on execution. I was lucky enough to answer directly to the CEO of one of those companies (AddThis) and directly to the CTO of the other (myYearbook, now meetme.com), which gave me a lot of access and insight into the mechanics, process, and thinking behind how a product actually comes to be. It turns out I really love certain aspects of it that aren’t even necessarily technical. I also really find the execution phase really exciting, and the rollout phase really almost overwhelmingly exciting.

I’ve found myself now with an idea that is really small and simple, but just won’t go away. It’s kind of gnawing at me, and the more I think about it, the more I think that, given what I’ve learned about product development, business-side product metrics, transforming some stories into an execution plan, etc., on top of my experience with software development, architecting for scalability, cloud services, tools/technologies for building distributed systems, etc., I could actually do this. It’s small and simple enough for me to get a prototype working on my own, and awesome enough to be an actual, viable product. So I’m doing it. I’m doing it too slowly, but I’m doing it.

By the way, the one thing I completely suck at is front end design/development. I can do it, but if I could bring on a technical co-founder of my own choosing, that person would be a front end developer who has pretty solid design chops. If you know someone, or are someone, get in touch – I’m @bkjones on Twitter, and bkjones at gmail. I’m jonesy on freenode. I’m not hard to find :)

In and Out of Love w/ NoSQL

I’ve recently added Riak to my toolbelt, next to CouchDB, MongoDB, and Redis (primarily). I was originally thinking that Riak would be a good fit for a project I’m working on, but have grown more uncomfortable with that notion as time has passed. The fact of the matter is that my data has relationships, and it turns out that relational databases are actually a really good fit in terms of the built-in feature set. The only place they really stink is on the operations side, but it also turns out that I have, like, several years of experience in doing that! Where I finally lost patience with NoSQL for this project was this huge contradiction that I never hear anyone ever talk about. You know the one — the one where the NoSQL crowd screams about how flexible everything is and how it really fits in with the “agile” mindset, and then in another doc in the same wiki strongly drives home the message that if you aren’t 100% sure what the needs of your app are, you should really make sure you have a grasp on that up front.

Uhh, excuse me, but if I’m iterating quickly on an app, testing in production, iterating on what works, failing fast, and designing in the direction of, and in direct response to, my customers, HOW THE HELL DO I KNOW WHAT MY APP’S NEEDS ARE?

So, what I’m starting with is what I know for sure: my data has relationships. I’m experienced enough with NoSQL solutions to understand my options for modeling them & enforcing the relationships, but when the relational aspect of the data is pretty much always staring you in the face and isn’t limited to a small subset of operations that rely on the relationships, it seems like a no-brainer to just use the relational database and spend my time writing code to implement actual features. If I find some aspect of the data that can benefit from a NoSQL solution later, well, then I’ll use it later!

Unit Testing Patterns

Most who know me know I’m kind of “into” unit testing. It’s almost like a craft unto itself, and one that I rather enjoy. I recently started a new job at AWeber Communications, where I’m working on a next-generation awesome platform to the stars 2.0 ++, and it’s all agile, TDD, kanban, and all that. It’s pretty cool. What I found in the unit tests they had when I got there were two main things:

First, the project used bare asserts, and used dingus in “mock it all!” mode. Combined, this led to tests that were mostly effective, but not very communicative in the event of failure, and they were somewhat difficult to reason about when you read them.

Second, they had a pretty cool pattern for structuring and naming that gave *running* the tests and viewing the output a more behavioral feel to them that I thought was pretty cool, and looked vaguely familiar. Later I realized it was familiar because it was similar to the very early “Introducing Behavioral Driven Development” post I saw a long time ago but never did anything with. If memory serves, that early introduction did not introduce a BDD framework like the ones popping up all over github over the past few years. It mostly relied on naming to relay the meaning, and used standard tools “behind the curtain”, and it was pretty effective.

So long story short, those tests have mostly been ported to use the mock module, and inherit from unittest2.TestCase (so, no more bare asserts). The failure output is much more useful, and I think the pattern that’s evolving around the tests now is unfinished but starting to look pretty cool! In the process, I also created a repository for unittest helpers that currently only contains a context manager that you feed a list of things to patch, and it’ll automatically patch and then unpatch things after the code under test is run. It has helped me start to think about building tests in a more consistent fashion, which means reading them is more predictable too, and hopefully we spend less time debugging them and less time introducing new developers to how they work.